Stefan Thomas, former Ripple: "I've lost almost $60 ...

All videos from EthCC '18 in Paris

Agenda (Google Sheets) | Agenda (PDF) | Official Site (ethcc.io)
Local timezone is Paris (GMT+1), all times are local time.

Day 1

Room: Paul Levé
09:00 Welcome to EthCC - Introductory remarks [15:25]
09:10 A call for an end to tribalism in Ethereum by Bob Summerwill [34:32]
11:00 ZoKrates - A Toolbox for zkSNARKS on Ethereum by Jacob Eberhardt [27:23]
11:40 Cryptographic Approaches to Smart Contract Privacy and Scalability by Metthew Di Ferrante [50:52]
13:40 Sublinear improvements in ringCT and blockchain-agnostic implementation by Silur [14:55]
14:10 Casper + Sharding = <3 by Vlad Zamfir [1:52:22]
16:50 Gnosis Safe - 2 Factor Authentication for Ethereum and lessons learned from Gnosis Multisig by Stefan George [39:44]
Room: Jean-Baptiste Say
09:15 The current state of token models by Evan Van Ness [24:50]
09:40 Personal data, privacy and ethics by Gregor Zavcer [30:40]
10:10 Base layer infrastructure for Web3 with Swarm by Viktor Tron [33:41]
11:10 Who owns you? The case for Linnia & Web 3.0 by Sajida Zouarhi [22:55]
11:30 Blockchain based SLA by Gerald Crescione & Victor Valladier [29:25]
12:00 Ocean Protocol: Towards a Practice of Token Engineering by Trent McConaghy [53:29]
13:30 Why eWASM? by Alex Beregszaszi [20:25]
13:50 From eWASM to Primea by Martin Becze [29:56]
14:20 Hacking eWASM - Cool demos! by Jared Wasinger & Lane Rettig [10:10]
14:55 Releasing the Hera with EVM-C by Paweł Bylica [10:39]
15:05 Hera: The eWASM VM by Jake Lang [12:56]
15:20 KWASM: Overview and path to KeWASM by Everett Hildebrandt [30:50]
16:50 Panel: entire eWASM team discussion and Q&A [53:10]
Room: Robert Faure
09:15 What I don't like about Ethereum by Rick Dudley [30:47]
09:45 Fuzzing by Casey Detrio [32:23]
11:00 Smart Contracts for Bribing Miners by Patrick McCorry [46:40]
11:30 Griefing Opportunities in Kleros by Clement Lesaege
13:40 An update from ENS by Nick Johnson [24:32]
14:00 BlockID identity on Ethereum by Christophe Charles, Loup Theron & Maxime Fernandez [17:01]
14:20 uPort approach to Ethereum Identity by Andres Junge [27:40]
14:50 Current State about Digital Identity by Fabrice Croiseaux & Antoince Detante [27:38]
15:20 Panel - Names & Identity [24:36]
17:00 Which governance for my tokens? by Philippe Honigman [41:23]
Room: Amphi Abbé Grégoire
09:25 Identifying & Managing Legal Risks in Blockchain Applications by Simon Polrot [22:44]
09:50 Rotkehlchen: Asset Management, Tax Reporting and Accounting Tool by Lefteris Karapetsas
11:00 Regulatory Framework for Blockchain Payments by Xavier Lavayssiere [27:26]
11:30 Balanc3 by Griffin Anderson [21:40]
14:40 Enterprise Ethereum Alliance by Jeremy Millar [30:02]
15:05 Ujo Music's Vision for a Music Ecosystem of Tomorrow by Jack Spalone [28:12]
15:35 Jaak by Vaughn McKenzie [27:21]
17:00 State of the Dapps - The Ecosystem of DApps by Fauve Altman [17:37]

Day 2

Room: Paul Levé
09:00 The Culture of Crypto Investing by Raine Revere [1:05:03]
11:00 How to do better ICOs by Fabian Vogelsteller [30:45]
11:30 ERC 777 (token) by Jordi Baylina & Jacques Dafflon [22:17]
12:00 Running Rust contracts on Kovan with WASM by Fredrik Harrysson [25:21]
13:40 Light Clients for Heavy Chains by Robert Habermeier [28:49]
14:10 The DAO Stack by Matan Field and Adam Levi [26:52]
14:35 Colony by Aron Fischer [20:24]
15:05 Decentralized governance by Jorge Izquierdo [1:16:06]
15:35 Cross blockchain atomic swaps between Etherum and Bitcoin by Konstantin Gladych [13:32]
16:30 Ethereum Alarm Clock: Scheduling Transactions for the Future by Logan Saether [29:50]
17:00 FunFair - scaling tech for mass market gaming by Jez San [31:57]
Room: Jean-Baptiste Say
09:00 Deodands, or how to give environmental resources the tools to save themselves by Stephan Tual [28:06]
09:20 Alice: transparent nonprofits on Ethereum by Raph Mazet [31:37]
09:50 Ethereum-based Energy Commons by Nicolas Loubet [23:42]
10:50 The Giveth Galaxy - Griff Green [27:10]
11:25 Blockchain for social applications - Vanessa Grellet [22:08]
11:55 Blockchain for good by Sandra Ro [23:42]
14:05 Circles – Universal basic income on the blockchain by Martin Lundfall [25:44]
14:35 OSN decentralized Research and open collaboration by Emi Velazquez [19:08]
15:05 Blockchain for education innovation by Jared Pereira [26:00]
15:35 Smartcontracts for public admin by Jean Millerat [34:13]
16:50 An Introduction To Kauri - Community managed knowledge and best practices for devs! by Joshua Cassidy [34:00]
Room: Robert Faure
09:00 Managing a legacy Dapp by Makoto Inoue [27:02]
09:30 Remix & Dapp development by Rob Stupay & Yann Levreau [28:54]
10:00 Bridging the ÐApp – Scaling now with Parity Bridge by Björn Wagner [39:40]
11:00 State of Python Ethereum tooling by Jason Carver [24:42]
11:30 Breaking Token Curated Registries, A Love Story by Nick Dodson [17:47]
14:10 Web3j: Web 3 Java Dapp API by Conor Svensson [31:37]
15:00 Linking Dapps together with Metadata by James Pitts [25:28]
15:30 Privacy on Swarm by Daniel Nagy [33:54]
16:50 Quorum & What Business Actually Wants in a Blockchain by Amber Baldet [37:47]
Room: Amphi Abbé Grégoire
09:00 Birdy: IoT for birdsnests by Pavel Kral & Josef Jelacic [14:50]
09:20 Flying Carpet by Julien Bouteloup [24:50]
09:50 Plantoid: IoT and Law by Primavera di Filippi [31:23]
10:50 Slock.it by Steffen Kux [33:30]
11:30 Prediciton markets by Lama Mansour [24:22]
13:40 A quick intro to Plasma cash by Vitalik Buterin [22:13]
13:55 Developing with Infura + Q&A by E.G. Galano & Nicola Cocchiaro [38:07]
14:50 Analyzing the Ethereum Blockchain with etherchain.org by Peter Pratscher [34:01]
15:25 ConsenSys Q&A: Investing and helping the Ethereum ecosystem grow by with Kavita and Jerome [23:53]
15:55 Blockchain Research Topics in economics and finance by Alexis Collomb [21:53]
16:35 Lightning Talks presented by Pascal Van Hecke [1:09:04] (details)

Day 3

Room: Paul Levé
09:00 Ethereum Scaling: Plasma & Sharding by Karl Floersch [42:00]
09:45 Scaling with Cosmos, Tendermint and Plasma by Adrian Brink [30:29]
10:45 Plasma - A Blockchain Scaling Story by David Knot [26:42]
11:25 A decentralized autonomous space agency, with Aragon at its core by Yalda Mousavinia [19:02]
12:00 DAOs, decentralized Governance by Matan Field [21:39]
13:40 Scalable Spanking by Ameen [30:13]
14:30 Raiden and state channels by Lefteris Karapetsas (not Jacob S. Czepluch) [15:05]
15:00 Scalability and inter-blockchain connection via Oraclize by Thomas Bertani [26:54]
15:35 iExec project update by Julien Beranger + Wassim Bendella [20:05]
16:10 Scaling EthCC by Jerome de Tychey [20:06]
Room: Jean-Baptiste Say
09:05 ERC 808 (bookings) by Hervé Hababou & Vidal Chriqui [25:30]
09:40 MyCrypto by Taylor Monahan [35:56]
10:50 Mutable resources by Louis Holbrook [24:22]
11:25 Video Livestreaming on decentralized internet by Eric Tang [30:07]
14:00 Building a Global Marketplace on Token Trade by Don Mosites [13:06]
14:20 Securing decentralized exchanges with hardware wallets by Nicolas Bacca [18:13]
14:45 Decentralized Key Management by MacLane Wilkinson [12:31]
15:15 Gnosis Dutch Exchange and the mechanism design of this decentralized exchange by Christiane Ernst [30:04]
Room: Robert Faure
09:00 Decentralized insurance: Lessons learned and the roadmap to an open platform by Christoph Mussenbroc [41:47]
09:50 Insurance for smart contracts by Hugh Karp [25:30]
10:40 Experimental - Gaming on Ethereum by Matías Nisenson & Luciano Bertenasco [16:35]
11:10 Gaming on Ethereum by Manon Burgel [22:01]
12:00 Doge Relay: The Collateralized Peg by Sina Habibian [23:52]
14:00 MakerDAO and DAI stable coin by Rune Christensen [30:39]
14:30 Variabl by Hadrien Charlanes [21:12]
15:05 Melonport by Jenna Zenk [24:04]
Room: Amphi Abbé Grégoire
09:40 ETH Prize by Ashley Tyson, Josh Stark & Robbie Bent [25:06]
10:50 Governance = <3 by Vlad Zamfir [1:15:50]
14:00 Kleros - A Justice System for the Decentralized Internet by Federico Ast [56:49]
15:00 Panel - Managing legal risk in the blockchain space [1:09:18]
Thanks to blockchainunchained for the initial setup in: https://redd.it/82wfwx
Please post any corrections or additions below and I'll update the post.
submitted by alsomahler to ethereum [link] [comments]

Here is a transcript from the Ripple Consensus Presentation (May 22nd)

https://www.xrpchat.com/topic/5203-ripples-big-demo-and-why-you-missed-the-big-deal/?do=findComment&comment=49659
MY TRANSCRIPTION... 0:19
PATRICK GRIFFIN: All right I think we're gonna get started. There's total capacity. People at the door - there's a little room over here inside. There's chairs here - there’s chairs over here don't be shy. All right in case you don't know this, you are in “XRP In Action,” a live demo and expert Q & A.
I’m Patrick Griffin [with] David Schwartz and Stefan Thomas. We've got an hour today. We'll walk you through, we’ll do a quick round of introductions. Stefan is going to do a demo. We have a self-guided Q&A where I basically tee up some questions for these guys that will all be softballs don't worry! Then we'll turn it over to you guys to ask questions for the technical experts. Maybe we'll do it the quick round of intros, starting with Stefan:
1:07 STEFAN THOMAS: Yeah so, my name is Stefan Thomas I am CTO with Ripple. Before Ripple I was involved with BitCoin for several years and now I work on the vision and technical direction for Ripple.
1:22 DAVID SCHWARTZ: My name is David Schwartz. I'm the chief cryptographer at Ripple. I’ve been working on Ripple since 2011 and public ledger tech. Before that I was working on cryptographic messaging systems and cloud storage for government and military applications.
1:35 PATRICK GRIFFIN: I am Patrick Griffin. I’m the head of business development. I don’t know why I’m up here, but there’s our CTO and our head of cryptography, but actually I think we are the, to be honest here, I think we are the, we are the one two and three first employees of Ripple. Well, two one and three. We've been here for quite some time and it's been a long journey. So why don't we first start off with the demo and I think I'll tee it up: This is a demo that demonstrates our technical our technology start of the inter ledger protocol, moving payments in and out of XRP and Stefan will do a better job of articulating what you are about to see.
2:22 STEFAN THOMAS: All right thanks Patrick. So here we're gathered to have a quick round table on XRP. I want to go through the demo pretty quickly so we can get to the actual discussion Q&A which I thin is the meat of this session. Basically, what we're trying to do at Ripple is we're trying to make money move like information. This has been our mission since day one, and it has never changed and so we're building a number of different technologies that all integrate to make this vision a reality. And so what we think about how information actually moves I think it's really it's really this chart that captures it.
So what's happened is that the cost of moving information has really declined over the last couple decades and very strongly so. And as a result the volume of information that’s been moving has exploded. And so, very often you know, our customers will be talking to me about, you know:
Oh are you focused on corporate payments? Are you focused on consumer payments?
I think what you have to realize is that we're somewhere down here in that curve and so you know when you say like two-thirds of all payments are corporate payments you're really talking about two-thirds of almost nothing. I think what we're focused on is this growth that you can create if you increase the efficiency of the system enough.
And so the way that we're kind of approaching that is we want to streamline the way that liquidity works today. So today you have 27 trillion dollars in float sitting around the world that is essentially there to facilitate real-time payments when the underlying systems are not real time.
3:59 STEFAN THOMAS: So, for instance, I swipe my credit card somewhere there has to be an actual creditor or money available to pay that merchant if that's supposed to happen instantly if the underlying money can't move in real time. And so that's been the case ever since we were using gold and fiat currencies in order to move money internationally, but with digital assets there's actually opportunity to improve upon that and actually move real assets in real time.
So if you have something like XRP you don't need to pre-fund float all around the world. You can actually just have this digital asset and if you want to transfer value to somebody, you want to transfer value internationally, you can just transfer that asset and that moves instantly okay?
4:40 STEFAN THOMAS: So that's really the improvement. So with that I want to give you sort of a case example in a demo. This is something that already happens on blockchains today where there are money sources business that are using, businesses they're using block chain in order to move funds so they might sort of offer this as a service to small and medium businesses where if I want to let's say pay somebody in a different country I can go to one of these companies and they will move that money for me.
5:09 STEFAN THOMAS: So, in this example, we're kind of pretending that we're a publisher, we have a reporter in the field. and we’d like to pay them. And so, you know we don't really build apps, but we enable banks and other money service businesses to build apps on top of our platform. So this is kind of a mock-up that we’ve developed where, you can imagine, this would be just built into the the particular app of that company. And so I can basically pick any amount, so let’s say I want to send, say $7, and what happens is that you can see is that amount updates so what happens during that time is that we actually try to find the cheapest path from where the sender is to which are provided at the recipient uses and then once we found that cheapest path, we figure out what the exact cost is going to be, so we have that transparency upfront. What is the cost of this payment and this is all powered by the open source protocol InterLedger. Now, when I send this payment, it goes through right away. I don't have to wait for a ton of confirmations and so on.
6:11 STEFAN THOMAS: So let's talk a little bit about what is happening there in the background. So first, we basically look at the topology of the network and then we try to find a path. So say it found a path through XRP. Once we select the path, we basically send a code request to figure out what we think that cost is going to be and then we send the money through in two phases as per InterLedger Protocol, and that's enabled on XRP using a feature called escrow that we just launched earlier this year and so now XRP is it's fully InterLedger enabled.
6:50 STEFAN THOMAS: So, if we look at the kind of a cost calculation, this is kind of some fictional numbers but it's correct in terms of order of magnitude, right. So you have Bitcoin, you have Theory, we have XRP, we have Swift, and so our algorithm basically goes in and it tries to select the best option and so people often ask me like why does InterLedger help XRP? or why are you guys working on InterLedger as a completely neutral protocol when you actually have this vested interest in XRP?
7:18 STEFAN THOMAS: Well, because the reason is that XRP is right now by far the best digital asset but it's not being used as much as Bitcoin, for instance, and so in order to close that gap we want to get to a point where the selection of asset is kind of automated and you have algorithms to just pick the best one in which case, right now, XRP would get picked all the time. So that's why we have such a vested interest in just enabling more efficient selection. All right. So as you can see, it's the lowest fee right now and it’s the fastest turn right.
7:48 STEFAN THOMAS: Now, going a little bit further into the future, I was kind of talking about that huge explosion in volume and I think where that comes from is completely new user inter faces that we don't necessarily think about today. So one example would be, you have something like a publisher and a reader and a reporter and the reader is actually browsing an article and they're not having to sign up and go through a paywall in order to do that Their browser just pays them on their behalf automatically and then as a publisher I can see the money sort of coming in, in real time as users are browsing my website. And so you're basically providing the sort of metered access to your content. There's just one example. I think there's a lot of cases of APIs and other parts the industry that could benefit from micro-payments as a more granular way of transacting. So I don't have time to talk about that, but with that I hope you've got sort of a taste of both what XRP looks like today as well as what the future holds in terms of doing micro payments through payment channels, and so on, on InterLedger. So with that, I'll hand it over to Patrick to start the discussion.
9:00 PATRICK GRIFFIN: Very cool. So maybe it’s worth stepping back and also looking at our company strategy and having a conversation around what it means when we talk about an Internet of Value, which I think well this is a Silicon Valley company and for most people that doesn't mean a whole lot so maybe we can take a first stab at trying to explain what is an Internet of Value and Stefan, I’ll start with you. Actually, why don’t we start with David and give you a break.
9:24 DAVID SCHWARTZ: Yeah, so what is the Internet of Value and what are we working on? Well, the Internet has brought connectivity to billions of people around the world. They have smart phones. They have easy access to the movement of information but money is still siloed. It's still trapped in systems that don't talk to each other. Moving payments are expensive. They're slow. There's high friction. There's trillions of dollars that moves across borders and that's moved mostly by financial institutions, and we need to move that money more efficiently. We need to know where it is. We need to improve that flow.
10:02 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I don't know if any of you have made international payments or most of you have on traditional systems and you know that it's very hard to know where that money is. It’s very hard to know how much it's going to cost you ahead of time. The user experience is not great. A significant fraction of those payments fail. It takes several days. It's almost easier to ship money than it is to use our existing payment system. So we want to provide an Internet of Value where there is instant payment. Payment on demand, without failure. When you know ahead of time how much money is going to deliver. You know what path is going to take and because that transaction is set up using modern internet protocols you know ahead of time exactly what the requirements are at the destination so you don't have a failure because you didn't have the right information at the beginning.
10:45 STEFAN THOMAS: Yeah so um whenever I think of the Internet of Value, I think the number one thing that happened with the internet was that it kind of commoditized reach. So, before the Internet, if you wanted to be an online service provider like AOL or CompuServe the number one thing that you needed to have in order to be competitive is a lot of users. And if the main thing you're competing over is just having a lot of users it's very hard to get into that market for obvious reasons because you start out with zero users so how do you attract the first couple? But once you have something like the internet where all the different networks are actually tied together, suddenly the number of users you have is completely irrelevant, right? Because all of the networks are tied together you can reach all the websites, you can email all the people on the internet and so the competition has to be about something else and what does it become about? It becomes about about the efficiency of the system.
11:35: STEFAN THOMAS: And so, this fundamental transition has not happened with money yet. Like right now the the biggest consumer payment systems are things like Visa and MasterCard and they're very much competing on: We’re the biggest. We have the most merchants. We have the most customers, and so how are you going to compete with us, right? We would not even have to try to be efficient, necessarily, right? Because we're only competing with each other. It's very hard to get into that market, and so what we're trying to do with InterLedger, by creating an internet working protocol we're allowing you to go across multiple hops across multiple steps through the financial system and as a result you can tie a lot of smaller providers, a lot of smaller banks together and as a result make a system that’s much more competitive.
12:15: PATRICK GRIFFIN: I’ll just add my two cents in. I when I talk about the Internet of Value with customers it's typically the conversation on the cost and opportunities and for us you know, one of the analogies it's overused in the internet I think the Internet of Value, at least for me, is the function of bringing the marginal cost of payment processing down to as close to zero as possible. Now you can do that in one of two ways: Lower the cost of payment processing. Just for the sake of conversation these two things are 50/50. Payment processing: the messaging going between institutions and the cost of reconciling transactions as they go from one siloed network to another siloed network. Those are huge costs that the system currently bears just as a function of tracking down lost payments or fixing mistakes and broken transactions.
13:00 PATRICK GRIFFIN: Something like 12% of all international wires fail. That is an astonishing number if you come from Silicon Valley where you're typically used to five nines of reliability. The financial system isn’t working even with one nine of reliability. The other side of the equation so that it’s a processing function. We are able to achieve better processing by starting that sort of settlement layer, it’s a little bit academic, but then ultimately what our customers are buying from us today is just a payment processing capability.
13:30 PATRICK GRIFFIN: The second stool, leg of the stool, if you will, this two-legged stool, for this Internet of Value, is liquidity. And this iquidity cost is a huge component of the payments that infrastructure today. And so, when you think about the cost that you pay when you wire money internationally, it's not just processing costs and fees. Banks and financial institutions and payment processors have to cover their cost of capital. They are laying out a massive amount of cash in different overseas accounts to make sure that when you send a payment to Japan there's cash on hand in Japan to service your payment.
14:05 PATRICK GRIFFIN: The whole visual that we saw here with XRP that's really where we see there being a large opportunity to bring the liquidity costs down if you can fund your payment instantly on demand without pre-floating cash or opening up credit lines with your counter-parties you can really bring down this component of that cost so those two things together in my mind at least that's that is what really comprises the internet of value. You tackle those two things: processing and liquidity really starts to open up and level the playing field. And on leveling the playing field maybe a question back to you Stefan is and a little bit about the strategy so as we go out and roll out these new APIs for bank to bank or financial institution processing, this narrative around using the digital assets upon payment certainly there's no reason why you couldn't insert Bitcoin in there or Etherium or some other digital assets do you view this as maybe leveling the playing field for all digital assets and creating an opportunity for other digital assets to come in and basically compete for that case?
STEFAN THOMAS: 15:12 Yeah so, we definitely look at it as as a way to create more competition I think that I'm just looking at the market today, most of the digital assets out there are not really designed for enterprising spaces, right? There they're coming from a background of direct to consumer use. They're kind of designed in a way that maybe isn't always necessarily totally in line with how regulators think about the financial system and as a result it’s quite difficult for companies to use these assets, so I think maybe some of people in the room are Bitcoin entrepreneurs and so you may know some of these struggles and you know some of these difficulties of using an asset like Bitcoin. I think you know me, speaking as CTO, more from the technical side, there are definitely big differences between the different digital assets, and so if you look at things like settlement speed on Ripple you get below four seconds most of the time four seconds on average. On Bitcoin you have to wait nine minutes between just to get one confirmation.
16:14 STEFAN THOMAS: There's things like finality. On Ripple when you get one confirmation you can hundred percent trust it, it cannot get reversed because the set of validators that are known so it can't be some validator you've never heard of suddenly coming up with a different answer. Whereas on Bitcoin, there can always be a longer chain that you just haven't heard of yet so you have to wait for multiple confirmations to gain more confidence. Another difference is that you know Ripple is non-deterministic and so bitcoin is is random so what that means is that the actual delay between blocks on Ripple is pretty consistent. It's four seconds with the standard deviation of 0.8 seconds so it's almost always exactly four seconds. And so, with Bitcoin it's more variable, right? So you could have a block after a minute. You can have a block after half an hour. And so, it's much harder for businesses to kind of rely on a system that has that high variability because it increases your risk as you holding an asset.
17:12 STEFAN THOMAS: So these are just some examples of why we think that XRP is best suited for payments use cases. And I think I'll give, be giving a talk later today on on going into a bit more depth on some of these differences
17:28 DAVID SCHWARTZ: And and we're not afraid of a level playing field. As Stefan said we think we can succeed on a level playing field but also you can get people to build a level playing field. It's very hard to get other people to stand behind something that has a built-in bias in favor of one company. Twitter doesn’t, it doesn't mind the fact that the internet wasn't built for Twitter. Facebook doesn't mind. They like the fact that there's an open platform that everybody can support and use and they're willing to compete on that level playing field and if they lose on that level playing field you know, so be it, somebody else will win and the world will be a better place for it. We believe that we have the advantages today and we believe that we can get the industry behind an open standard that facilitates these types of instantaneous payments.
18:07 PATRICK GRIFFIN: So David, this is a question coming back to you. In this level playing field obviously there are digital assets can compete on different characteristics. Obviously I think that Bitcoin as scalability challenges have been I think very famous recently could you comment a little bit on Bitcoin’s recent lows some of the things that have come up around resiliency scalability and maybe draw a contrast to XRP and how XRP is working.
18:32 DAVID SCHWARTZ: Sure. I think the idea that you don't need governance. The idea that you can just have this decentralized system that magically government itself doesn't really work. The internet is a decentralized system it has governance. Bitcoin currently is experiencing a little bit of a governance failure due to with dis-alignment of incentives. Historically the minerss have had an incentive to keep the system working. Everybody needs the Bitcoin system to work, whether you hold, whether you try to do payment’s, whether you're mining. This system has to work or nobody has anything. Everybody's benefited from the value of Bitcoin going up. If you’re a miner, you want the value to go up. If you hold Bitcoin, you want the value to go up. If you're using it for payments having more liquidity and lower risk and holding bitcoins is good for you.
19:11 DAVID SCHWARTZ: So everybody's incentives were aligned. They're starting to become dis-aligned recently because miners have been getting a lot of revenue from transaction fees Miners like high transaction fees. Users obviously would prefer to pay less for their payments. People who want to use Bitcoin as a payment platform want frictionless payments and they're not getting them because of the fees. So there's been a little bit of a governance breakdown due to that misalignment of incentives and it's not clear how you resolve that. It's not really clear how the stakeholders can realign their incentives.
19:39 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I’m confident that Bitcoin will come out come through it but I think it shows that governance is important. You should understand how a system is governed whatever system it is because there is going to have to be governance. It’s not going to magically govern itself. Now Ripple, the stakeholders are the validators and the validators are sort of chosen by the other validators, so right now Ripple is obviously very big in that space. We’re the major stakeholder on the network, but the recent interest into the price increase has begun diversifying the stakeholders and so we hope to see different jurisdictions, different companies and those will be the people who will be the stakeholders and they'll make the decision if there are going to be changes in the rules behind in that market. We think that that will work better and I think if you, once you accept that there has to be governance, you really want it to be the people who are using the network. You don't want the technology to force you into having other stakeholders whose interest may be adverse to the people who just want to use the system to store value and make payments.
20:32 PATRICK GRIFFIN: So what stuff, I mean do you have anything to add just in terms of the underlying design of the systems and how they're confirming transactions? I think when you go way way way back to our company's beginning it was billed as Bitcoin 2.0. And you know we felt like there was another way you could build a decentralized digital asset without without mining. So maybe talk a little about the confirmation engine behind XRP and some of its advantages over other systems
21:04 STEFAN THOMAS: Yeah, so as I mentioned in the introduction, I was fairly involved in the in the Bitcoin community back in 2010-2011 and one of the features that I contributed to was paid to script hash as a reviewer it was one of the first people to re-implement Bitcoin and I pointed out some flaws and you know we ended up with a much better solution. And so, through that experience going through the cycle of new feature on Bitcoin, even back then when the committee was much smaller I realized that it was actually very painful to do even a uncontroversial improvement to the system and that was partly because people had a very strong tendency to be conservative which is a good thing, for any, like whenever you're modifying a live system. But there was also just like no good process for introducing changes.
22:00 STEFAN THOMAS: We had to come up with a process ad hoc. We came up with this whole voting on mining power and so on. Now, from that experience I remember going back to a wiki page on the big part of working called the hard fork wish list and I kind of looked at and is sort of the list of things other things that we wanted to do and a lot of them were in my opinion, in my humble opinion, must haves for any kind of mainstream or enterprise adoption and so I was kind of like putting numbers next to them like this would take eight months this would take 12 months this would take two years and it started to add up like I'm not going to see this get to that point if we go at this rate.
22:38 STEFAN THOMAS: And then you know Ripple approached me and they had a lot of that hard fork wish list already implemented but maybe more importantly they had a different idea on the governance structure and I think there's sort of two key differences: The first key difference is there is an entity that's actually funding the development of the asset and all the technology behind the asset. And so you know, I was looking at the Bitcoin foundation website the other day and they're currently, their most recent blog post is to promote this lawsuit in New York to try to strike down the bit license and apparently the foundation feels that it's strategically important for Bitcoin to kind of fund this lawsuit and they looked at how many people had actually donated to the donation address that they were giving and it was just over a thousand dollars basically. Almost nothing
23:31 STEFAN THOMAS: And I was thinking like well if XRP you know had any strategic issue like that there would be millions of dollars immediately that just Ripple would put behind the issue and so as a holder of the asset that's really important for me to know that, you know, there is some some entity that's actually defending it from a technical standpoint, from a legal standpoint, from a business standpoint. That makes a big difference
23:53 STEFAN THOMAS: And then the second big difference that I saw was how features and how generally the evolution of the technology is managed. So on Ripple, there's voting among the validators, which is not too dissimilar from you know the kind of mining voting that we're doing on Bitcoin. However the validators on Ripple are largely chosen by the users or they are chosen by the users. And so they're not chosen by so this algorithm or just by their virtue of being very efficient in mining. And so as David pointed out earlier, the incentives are very different. On Ripple, the incentives are you know I want the people who are appointing me to be validators to be happy with my validations because otherwise you know there's what they will stop paying me. And so you know there's a much more closely aligned incentive for the value of some Ripple to do what the actual users want to do.
24:46 DAVID SCHWARTZ: And I would add that there there are sort of vulnerabilities in both types of systems. Like with the miners, it would be a double spend. With the validators, they could simply stop validating and the network would halt, but one tremendous difference is that you know how to fix one and it's not clear how you would fix the other so if you had the miners that were being pressured, let's say by a friend in government, or they were double spending or for whatever reason they are holding transaction fees high, let's say the block size issue got to the point where it was absolutely critical and there was no ability to come up with an agreement. It's not clear how you solve that. You change the mining algorithm? Like that's the nuclear option? Nobody knows what you do. With the system on consensus it is clear what you do. You can, you can change the validators. The validators work at the pleasure of the users, the holders, the real stakeholders of the network.
25:33 DAVID SCHWARTZ: That, I think that is a fairly significant advantage once you realize how important governance is. And it's not just a handle of failure as Stefan pointed out there's going to be evolution of the system unless you think the systems are absolutely perfect today. Well bitcoin is already proven that there they're not absolutely perfect today. I can’t, I certainly wouldn't try to claim the Ripple is perfect today. We have a wish list of features too, limited by engineering time, but we have to get people to agree to implement those features and I think that's also an argument why you can't have one blockchain to rule them all. There are features that also have costs and every feature has a cost because if you have a public blockchain everybody that uses that public blockchain, at a minimum, when there's a new feature they have to do a security review and make sure that that feature doesn't create a vulnerability for them. So there's a fixed cost that's fairly high. There's a huge bug bounty on Bitcoin and on Ripple right? Billions of dollars if you could steal money on the system. So the cost to implement a feature is high. So if there's a feature that somebody really wants it would be really useful for them they're probably not going to get that's not enough to get any feature on the system, so you're going to have a diversified system of multiple block chains and multiple ledger systems of all kinds competing with each other for share. that's why I think InterLedger is important because InterLedger will permit people who use different block chains and different systems, for good reasons, to be able to make payments to each other quickly seamlessly and without the risk associated with little pays problem.
26:53 PATRICK GRIFFIN: hmm Maybe just a last question before we turn it over to the audience and you've mentioned InterLedger. Stefan is the creator of InterLedger or the chief architect of it. When you walk around the conference today, you'll see a lot of companies that have blockchain offering. So, sort of going back to 2014, now if you remember, the the terminology and the marketing was all about it's not about Bitcoin it's about the blockchain. And so now we have some sound perspective on that. What's your take on the fundamental premise of a de-centralized distributed database without a digital asset and what's the trade-offs in terms of functionality versus utility? What's your opinion given the architecture IOP.
27:42 STEFAN THOMAS: Well that's a question I could easily spend hours on, so let me try to summarize. So as you mentioned, my colleague Evan Schwartz and I, we we came up with this protocol InterLedger and that came out of actually in a couple of different work streams but one in particular I remember was I was trying to figure out how to make Ripple more scalable and I was thinking about a particular kind of scalability which is similar to what David just mentioned, which was scalability in terms of functionality not just in terms of how many transactions can you do per second. Like how do I serve very different use cases that have you know mutually conflicting trade-offs. So as I was thinking about that problem I was kind of saying well maybe you don't even have to keep that one set of global state. Maybe you can have state in different places and a lot of that is honestly just rediscovering database knowledge that we've had since the 70s. Now just looking at Jim Gray's papers and just oh yeah that works for blockchains too
28:41 STEFAN THOMAS: So we took those ideas and we combined them with ideas around from the internet from the internet background in terms of networking and the concept of internet working and so on. And so, when I look at these private blockchains type approaches I think they are doing the first of those two steps namely they're applying sort of modern data, modern database thinking or classical database thinking to blockchain but I don't think they're really applying the Internet thinking yet because they're if they're attempting to achieve interoperability just by homogeneity which does not give you that diversity of use cases and so if you want that you have to think about what are the simple stateless protocols they can actually tie these different systems together without dictating how they work internally. So I can have my private blockchains that has all these like special features and it works in this way and you can have your private box and it works in the other way but we can still talk through a neutral protocol and you know the way that we're thinking about InterLedger, we're not married to InterLedger being a thing like I'm completely happy if it's lightning or if it's something else but I think as an industry to agree on some kind of standard on that layer.
29:51 STEFAN THOMAS: I think one of the reasons that we can is because unlike a blockchain a standard is neutral you know there's no acid anyone's getting rich off of. There's no there's a lot less to agree on. The list of decisions you have to make is a lot shorter. You know my colleague Evan, he makes a point, a very good point about with InterLedger only like seven eight major decisions that you have to make in the architecture to really arrive at it and so I think we have really good reasons for each one of them and so we think that there will be a certain convergence on on one standard protocol for again not just blockchains, but like any kind of ledger.
30:26 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I just ant to add that InterLedger is completely neutral to how the ledger works internally. Any ledger that can support a very short list of very simple operations. Every banking ledger can perform those operations. Almost anything the tracks ownership of value of any kind is capable of confirming that value exists, putting that value on hold, transferring that value between two people and those are the only primitives that InterLedger builds on. It's just by the clever combination of those operations in a way that provides insurance that all of the stakeholders get out of the transaction the thing that they're supposed to get out and get back whatever they were going to put in if they don't get out what they're supposed to get out. It’s, it's astonishingly simple at the protocol level.
31:08 PATRICK GRIFFIN: Okay, with that I will turn it over to the room for questions and some Q&A Aany questions in the back?
QUESTION: Yeah, I’m kind of new to this and I just have some really basic questions. I read something recently where, Ripple was now the second most funded, or invested. Bitcoin was first, and Etherium was third. Can you tell me how you got to that position? You seem like you’re poking up about Bitcoin and how Ripple probably is more efficient and better. Then I had a second question - Where do I get a Ripple T-Shirt?
32:06 PATRICK GRIFFIN: The first question is how did, how did we get to this position we're in and does that generally capture the essence of that question and then Ripple t-shirts I'm not sure about that (Come work for us!) I will attempt to answer the first question and if you guys want to jump in. I think that is a function of one: Silicon Valley companies do one thing I think very well, they pick a lane and they go deep on it. For us, what we've been very very focused on it the use case. as a company we but we picked a long time ago to go deep on cross-border payments and in particular wholesale cross-border payments that’s financial institution to institution. It’s at the enterprise level and so when we look at digital assets today we think that there is a very very very use case around the consolidation of capital to fund payments overseas, which is exactly what we just demonstrated. Being able to transfer an asset from a server in one country to a server in another country and basically allow for payments companies to operate with much less capital deployed overseas. It's a, it's a quantifiable use case. Today there's 27 and a half trillion dollars in float in the banking system just wait sitting idly waiting for payments to arrive. That's compounded when you go to look at corporates and you look at payment service companies. So there's a very very very very very big number and I think that the recent traction that we've gotten has been an acknowledgement of the use case how it fits into our overall product offering. Ssome of the technical benefits of XRP itself and then when you look around, I mean I think that its head, you're hard-pressed to find another digital asset with as clearly articulated the use case that where the time horizon is now. I think there's lots of really exciting things going on in IOT and device-to-device payments and sort of the future some of things that I that Etherium people talk about for example, but it still feels like it's still at the horizon and I think this is being deployed today. There is a a path to commercial production and ultimately I think that's part of the reason why we're getting some traction.
34:18 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I think we also sort of crossed an important threshold. If an asset doesn't have value and it doesn't have liquidity you can't really use it even if it has the properties that are perfect for your use case simply because you can't you can't get enough of it without moving the market and I think we crossed a threshold (not the end) -
*use the link above to view the entire transcript.**
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Casascius Aluminium Physical Bitcoin Beyond Bitcoin First Republic Bitcoin is #MMMGlobal! Bitcoins: Wie zuverlässig funktioniert die Internetwährung?  Galileo  ProSieben Bitcoin: Chino sees pattern in Fed arrests

Die „Miner“, de Bitcoin sozusagen fördern, prüfen mit ihren Rechnern die Blöcke, in denen die Bitcoin-Transaktionen gespeichert werden. Aktuell dauert so eine Transaktion rund 10 Minuten ... During this week’s Bitcoin.com podcast our host, Richard Jacobs, sits down with Stefan Thomas, CTO of Ripple Labs to discuss his company’s “real-time gross settlement protocol” Ripple (XRP). New Bitcoin.com Podcast Episode with Stefan Thomas of Ripple Labs Stefan Thomas von We Use Coins kann dem Vorfall eine positive Seite abgewinnen: "Der Fall mit Mt. Gox dieses Wochenende zeigt deutlich, dass Bitcoin nun groß genug ist, um ein Angriffsziel für ... — Stefan Thomas (@justmoon) May 30, 2019 Ripple CEO David Schwartz also took part in the storm tweet, joking that users could ask Stefan about bitcoins, aliens and other topics. Ask him about losing thousands of bitcoins and about aliens with extraordinary abilities. Stefan and Thomas are Bitcoin veterans who implemented various Bitcointalk community projects in 2013. Together they also founded the successful online forum China-Devices. In his professional career Stefan runs the YouTube Tech channel “Techmagnet” with more than 290k subscribers and works together with a lot of reputable brands around the globe. Thomas is employed as an engineer in an ...

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Casascius Aluminium Physical Bitcoin

В чём суть? Суть проста - люди здесь помогают друг другу. Всё! Больше ничего здесь нет. Заполните форму для ... How Bitcoin work and why Cryptocurrency collectible cards Super short and Kick-AsS video explaining How Bitcoin network work who da hell are miners and how it all having to do with collectible bitcoin crypto currency tokens ico's initial coin offereings ethereum morpheus titania thomas costanzo freedoms phoenix dash litecoin segwit 2x price segregated witness client wallets roger ver ... Co-creators Stefan Thomas and Evan Schwartz discuss the ILP and its potential uses in connecting disparate payments networks at Stone and Chalk in Sydney. ⬇---SHOW MORE---⬇⬇ Ledger Nano S ... Check out coinspot, the easiest exchange to use for buying/trading bitcoin and altcoins https://www.coinspot.com.au?affiliate... Ever wanted to develop altcoins from the bitcoin source code? In ...

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